The Evens Science Prize 2013

The international expert jury selected the project 'Upregulating the eural substrates of empathy via neurofeedback' of Prof. Gruzelier (Godsmiths, University of London) and Prof. Sander (University of Geneva) as the laureate of the 2013 Evens Science Prize.

The 2013 edition focused on the fascinating topic of the neurscience of empathy. The international expert jury unanimously selected the project 'Upregulating the eural substrates of empathy via neurofeedback' of Prof. Gruzelier (Godsmiths, University of London) and Prof. Sander (University of Geneva) as the laureate of the 2013 Evens Science Prize.

The jury praised the solidity of the proposal, and strongly approved of the collaboration between two universities, the sharing of infrastructure and talent. They also found the use of neurofeedback extremely interesting. This suggested that the project had the potential to lead to intervention to encourage and promote empathy in individuals. Last but not least, the jury wanted to celebrate Prof. Gruzelier for his many years’ commitment to neurofeedback, which struggled for many years to establish its credibility in scientific circles but, thanks to deeper and more thorough research, has increasingly gained recognition.
The winning project received the sum of €30.000 to support the research.

The international expert jury selected the project 'Upregulating the eural substrates of empathy via neurofeedback' of Prof. Gruzelier (Godsmiths, University of London) and Prof. Sander (University of Geneva) as the laureate of the 2013 Evens Science Prize.

The 2013 edition focused on the fascinating topic of the neurscience of empathy. The international expert jury unanimously selected the project 'Upregulating the eural substrates of empathy via neurofeedback' of Prof. Gruzelier (Godsmiths, University of London) and Prof. Sander (University of Geneva) as the laureate of the 2013 Evens Science Prize.

The jury praised the solidity of the proposal, and strongly approved of the collaboration between two universities, the sharing of infrastructure and talent. They also found the use of neurofeedback extremely interesting. This suggested that the project had the potential to lead to intervention to encourage and promote empathy in individuals. Last but not least, the jury wanted to celebrate Prof. Gruzelier for his many years’ commitment to neurofeedback, which struggled for many years to establish its credibility in scientific circles but, thanks to deeper and more thorough research, has increasingly gained recognition.
The winning project received the sum of €30.000 to support the research.