Evens Education Prize

The Evens Prize for Education gathers some of the concerns we addressed in our previous Prizes for Media Education and Peace Education.
After several editions, we noticed that the strongest applicants for both prizes tended to emphasize education that stimulates critical thinking. This led us to define a new Evens Education Prize dedicated to the promotion of critical thinking as a practice of freedom.

Critical thinking has figured as an educational goal for almost a century, and many high-level educational policy documents declare it to be an essential ability in a democratic culture. However, it is also a concept that has acquired different meanings and is widely debated.

We see critical thinking as a social practice that stimulates (young) people to think actively and deeply about an issue at hand in order to see and understand it from different perspectives before reaching a conclusion. Critical thinking creates dialogical and shared learning experiences that are crucial in diverse contexts.
Not only does it foster better understanding of one’s own thoughts and openness to new ideas and other viewpoints, it also helps us to understand how interpretation and knowledge are socially constructed, gives voice to people or groups who have been silent or silenced, and allows us to discuss complex issues.

Through our work in the field of conflict transformation, teaching controversies and media literacy, we have identified an acute need for such empowerment through education if we want to begin to address the increasing discords, polarization and disinformation that are challenging our democracies. We believe that it is essential for pluralistic democratic societies that citizens are able to think and work together to build a common world while respecting each other’s differences.

The Evens Prize for Education gathers some of the concerns we addressed in our previous Prizes for Media Education and Peace Education.
After several editions, we noticed that the strongest applicants for both prizes tended to emphasize education that stimulates critical thinking. This led us to define a new Evens Education Prize dedicated to the promotion of critical thinking as a practice of freedom.

Critical thinking has figured as an educational goal for almost a century, and many high-level educational policy documents declare it to be an essential ability in a democratic culture. However, it is also a concept that has acquired different meanings and is widely debated.

We see critical thinking as a social practice that stimulates (young) people to think actively and deeply about an issue at hand in order to see and understand it from different perspectives before reaching a conclusion. Critical thinking creates dialogical and shared learning experiences that are crucial in diverse contexts.
Not only does it foster better understanding of one’s own thoughts and openness to new ideas and other viewpoints, it also helps us to understand how interpretation and knowledge are socially constructed, gives voice to people or groups who have been silent or silenced, and allows us to discuss complex issues.

Through our work in the field of conflict transformation, teaching controversies and media literacy, we have identified an acute need for such empowerment through education if we want to begin to address the increasing discords, polarization and disinformation that are challenging our democracies. We believe that it is essential for pluralistic democratic societies that citizens are able to think and work together to build a common world while respecting each other’s differences.

Past prizes in Education